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1 John and Susan divorced 1878 Maine Supreme Judicial Court Records (Somerset Co.), 18/117 (docket no. 825).
The 1880 census shows Susan living with the Jacob Gardner family as their housekeeper, she has Joseph and Martha living with her. John is living on the Lydia Waite farm as a farm laborer, he has Mary with him. 
Family: F00297
 
2 One record gives the marriage location as Andover, Massachusetts Family: F03552
 
3 One record gives the marriage location as Topsfield, Massachusetts Family: F00587
 
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LEOPOLD LANCTOT, OMI, FAMILLES ACADIENNES, TOME II, PAGE 134.
MARRIED IN 1654 PORT ROYAL, FRANCOIS SAVOYE, 3 SONS AND 6 DAUGHTERS. 
Family: F00083
 
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LEOPOLD LANCTOT, OMI, FAMILLES ACADIENNES, TOME II, PUBLISHED IN FRENCH IN 1911. IN ENGLISH THEY WERE MARRIED IN 1636, LA HEVE OR PORT ROYAL. 
Family: F01165
 
6 Second President of The United States of America John Adams
 
7 Governor of Massachusetts
Patriot of the American Revolution 
Samuel Adams
 
8 Fran?ois Amirault was born in Tours, the capital city of Touraine, one of the old provinces of France. The names of his parents are not known. The surname, Tourangeau, was given because he came from Tours. Tours is situated southwest of Paris on the Loire River which eventually flows to the Atlantic Ocean. From one of the coastal ports, Fran?ois embarked on one of the ships that frequently made the crossing to Acadia.
Fran?ois Amirault is the sole French source of this name in Acadia. His age cannot be firmly established. At the Acadian Archives in Moncton, he is shown as having been born in 1664: however, in the 1686 Acadian census, he is noted as being 42 years old (born in 1644), in the 1693 census, 38 years old (born in 1655), and in the 1708 census, 66 years old (born in 1642). It is generally taken, though, that he was born in 1644.
Fran?ois, an ambitious lad with a strong sense of adventure, came to Acadia around 1680, no doubt intrigued by the stories he had heard about this new colony. After several weeks at sea, he arrived at this new home. He settled in Port Royal where, in 1684 he married Marie Pitre. Marie Pitre was born in 1666, the oldest daughter of Jean Pitre "dit" Beneque, an edge tool maker of Flemish origin and Marie Pesselet. The Pitre's had settled in Port Royal several years earlier and were married in 1664. Maries' grandparents, Isaac Pesselet (from Champagne, France) and Barbe Bayols (or, Bajolet) arrived in Acadia on board the Saint Jehan which sailed from La Rochelle, France in 1636. Through her mother, Marie Pitre inherited an estate of land in Pobomcoup (later, Pubnico), in the family through Barbe Bayols. It is this estate of land in Pobomcoup, which encompassed the southern point of the Acadian peninsula, where for 35 years Fran?ois Amirault and Marie Pitre lived, raising their 11 children.
The children were born at Port Royal: Marie (1685) and Fran?ois (1687). In 1688, the Amirault family settled at Cape Sable. Born there were Joseph on December 8, 1689 and Anne on December 14, 1691. At Port Razoir, about 45 miles from Cape Sable, they had Jeanne on November 16, 1694 and Madeleine on March 14, 1697. The last five children were born at Baccaro, an Indian village where Fran?ois acquired some land, 24 miles away from Cape Sable. These were Pierre on May 9, 1699, Charles on June 14, 1700, Jacques on July 31, 1702, Marguerite in 1704 and Elizabeth-Isabelle in 1709. In June 1705, Father F?lix Pain, in a single ceremony, baptized eight of these children (Joseph to Marguerite).
Fran?ois and Marie are found living at Port Royal, near the fort in 1714. In 1719, they are noted as living at the East Coast, that is, Cape Sable. They were still at Cape Sable when their daughter Marguerite got married in September, 1723. However, two years later when another daughter, Jeanne, was married, they were at Cobequid. 
Francois Amirault, dit Tourangeau
 
9 He owned lands in the center of town. After the Indian massacre at Lancaster 10 Feb 1675-6, he removed to Dorchester, then to Milton in 1678 and finally to Sherborn, where he died James Atherton
 
10 Mi'kmaq Marie Aubois
 
11 Daniel was a soldier in the revolution in the summer of 1775. He was in Capt. Joshua Bragdon's company, Colonel Scammon's regiment. Daniel Baston
 
12 In June, 1783, Daniel Baston, who settled in Denmark in 1775, being its first settler, left his farm near Baston Hill, and came across the Saco on a raft, settling on the farm later owned by L.A. and Eli Wadsworth on Hiram Hill. Later he divided his farm among his 3 sons; Royal, Loami and Winthrop. His youngest son, Benjamin, located on the "Boston Road". Daniel Baston
 
13 Enlisted as a Corporal on 13 October 1862 at the age of 23
Enlisted in Company K, 28th Infantry Regiment Maine on 13 October 1862.
Promoted to Full Sergeant on 13 June 1863
Mustered out Company K, 28th Infantry Regiment Maine on 31 August 1863 in Augusta, ME 
George H. Baston
 
14 Enlisted as a Corporal on 14 October 1862 at the age of 20
Enlisted in Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment Maine on 14 October 1862.
Died Company K, 21st Infantry Regiment Maine on 04 April 1863 
Thomas F. Baston
 
15 Soldier in the war of 1812. William Baston
 
16 PFC US ARMY WORLD WAR II Raymond Beaupre
 
17 105th Infantry 27th Division
Killed in Action WWII
Purple Heart MedalBronze Star Medal 
Thomas Beaupre
 
18 Cival War Penshioner - Company D 24th Maine Infantry Regiment Carlton Berry
 
19 Private First Class
51st Armored Infantry Battalion
4th Armored Division
Killed in Action WWII 
Edward J. Berry
 
20 ?Cival War Penshioner - Company D 24th Maine Infantry Regiment John T. Berry
 
21 World War II Veteran - U S Navy gunner aboard the destroyer USS Tausig Robert A. Berry
 
22 They divorced in Apr 1882 Frederick Blake
 
23 1861 Census of Salisbury, Westmorland, New brunswick, Canada - listed as John Sherman Bleakney 7 years old Race=Native John Sherman Blakeney
 
24 killed in combat with the Iroquois Joachim Boucher
 
25 Governer of Trois Rivieres, Quebec, Canada Pierre Boucher
 
26 George W. E. Brown of Bingham, ME enlisted as a private on 21 Dec. 1861 at the age of 44 in the
4th Light Artillery Regiment of Maine, discharged from same on 5 May 1863.

The 4th battery remained at Portland until April l, 1862,
when it left for Washington. It was stationed in and about
Washington until June 28, when it joined Gen. Sigel's command
in their march up the Shenandoah valley and participated in
the battle of Cedar mountain, losing 1 killed, 6 wounded and 1
missing. Later it returned to Culpeper with Gen. Banks'
corps, and retreated to Washington with Gen. Pope's army. It
was in the battle of Antietam, and spent the winter of 1862-63
at Shepherdstown and Harper's Ferry. After the defeat of Gen.
Milroy at Winchester, it moved to Monocacy Junction, and on
July 8 was assigned to the 3d corps, Gen. French commanding.
It was engaged in the action at Wapping heights, Oct. 15, and
at Kelly's ford, Nov. 7, and went into camp at Brandy Station
on the 11th. It was engaged on Nov. 30 at Mine Run, returned
to Brandy Station and remained there until March 31, 1864,
where it was assigned to the artillery brigade of the 6th
corps and participated in the battle of Cold Harbor. From
June 17 to July 13, 1864, it was in position in front of
Petersburg and was then ordered to join the 6th corps at
Washington. Finding the corps advanced to Harper's Ferry, the
battery returned to Petersburg, and was assigned temporarily
to the 5th corps. It was in the action of July 30, losing 2
men. On Dec. 21, 1864, 21 of the original members were
mustered out, but the battery remained in service until June
17, 1865.
 
G. William Easley Brown
 
27 Enlistment Date: 14 January 1862
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE
Side Served: Union
State Served: Maine
Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 14 January 1862 at the age of 19
Enlisted in 4th Light Artillery Regiment Maine on 14 January 1862.
 
Jonathan E Brown
 
28 Enlistment Date: 21 December 1861
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE
Side Served: Union
State Served: Maine
Service Record: Promoted to Full Corporal (1864)
Enlisted as a Private on 21 December 1861 at the age of 23
Enlisted in 4th Light Artillery Regiment Maine on 21 December 1861.
Reenlisted in 4th Light Artillery Regiment Maine on 14 January 1864
Discharged 4th Light Artillery Regiment Maine on 13 January 1865

The 4th battery remained at Portland until April l, 1862,
when it left for Washington. It was stationed in and about
Washington until June 28, when it joined Gen. Sigel's command
in their march up the Shenandoah valley and participated in
the battle of Cedar mountain, losing 1 killed, 6 wounded and 1
missing. Later it returned to Culpeper with Gen. Banks'
corps, and retreated to Washington with Gen. Pope's army. It
was in the battle of Antietam, and spent the winter of 1862-63
at Shepherdstown and Harper's Ferry. After the defeat of Gen.
Milroy at Winchester, it moved to Monocacy Junction, and on
July 8 was assigned to the 3d corps, Gen. French commanding.
It was engaged in the action at Wapping heights, Oct. 15, and
at Kelly's ford, Nov. 7, and went into camp at Brandy Station
on the 11th. It was engaged on Nov. 30 at Mine Run, returned
to Brandy Station and remained there until March 31, 1864,
where it was assigned to the artillery brigade of the 6th
corps and participated in the battle of Cold Harbor. From
June 17 to July 13, 1864, it was in position in front of
Petersburg and was then ordered to join the 6th corps at
Washington. Finding the corps advanced to Harper's Ferry, the
battery returned to Petersburg, and was assigned temporarily
to the 5th corps. It was in the action of July 30, losing 2
men. On Dec. 21, 1864, 21 of the original members were
mustered out, but the battery remained in service until June
17, 1865.
 
Lyman G. Brown
 
29 Went to prison after he shot and killed a man in the early 1930's leaving his wife to raise all 10 children alone. Perley True Brown
 
30 Received a grant of 200 acres of land on 14 Jan. 1788 in Queensbury Parish, York County, New Brunswick, Canada Silvanus Hebden Brown
 
31 Enoch served during the Civil War in Company D, of the 1st Regiment of Minnesota Infantry Volunteers. The 1st Minnesota was in Gibbon's Division, 2nd Corps and was organized on April 1861.

He enlisted on April 15, 1861 and was discharged on May 5, 1864, having served 3 years, 20 days. He was in the following battles: Bull Run, Ball's Bluff, Edwards Ferry, Gettysburg, First & Second Fredericksburg, Antietam, Berrysville, Yorkton, White-House Landing, Fair Oak, Peach Orchard, Savge Station, White Oak Swamp, 2nd Bull Run, Centreville, Flint Hill, Hay Market, South Mountain and 2 days at Malvern Hill.

 
Enoch Heald Chandler
 
32 Joseph enlisted in Co. K of the 1st Minnesota Infantry on December 12, 1861 and served for a year and a half. He then transferred to Battery A of the First Rhode Island and served one year. He then re-enlisted in the 1st Minnesota Infantry, Company B and served until the end of the war and was discharged on July 15, 1865. He was in a total of 27 battles. He ended his service as a corporal.

After the war, he became a lumberman in Mill Lac County, Minnesota.

In the 1885 Minnesota State Census, he is living in Osseo, Hennepin County. Page 595 taken June 1885. He is living with Aura, age 20 born in Luxemburg and Willie, age 1 born in Minnesota. 
Joseph Cushing Chandler
 
33 Her's is the earliest dated marker in the Brooklyn & Maple Grove UnionCemetery Sally Stearns Chandler
 
34
Margaret Chase-Smith,(wife of Clyde Harold Smith) was a Representative and a Senator from Maine. She was born Margaret Madeline Chase, December 14, 1897, in Skowhegan, Somerset County, Maine, where she attended the public schools; later she taught school in Skowhegan, Maine 1916-1917. She was a business executive for a country weekly newspaper and a woolen company 1919-1930; secretary to her husband while he was in Congress 1937-1940. She served as a Lieutenant Colonel, Air Force Reserve 1950-1958. Elected as a Republican to the Seventy-sixth Congress, by special election, June 3, 1940, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of her husband, Clyde H. Smith. She was reelected to the four succeeding Congresses and served from June 3, 1940, to January 3, 1949. She was not a candidate for reelection, but was elected in 1948 to the United States Senate; reelected in 1954, 1960 and 1966 and served January 3, 1949, until January 3, 1973. She was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1972. During her time in office she was chairwoman, Special Committee on Rates of Compensation (Eighty-third Congress), Republican Conference (Ninetieth through Ninety-second Congresses), ranking Republican member on Armed Services Committee (Ninetieth through Ninety-second Congresses), ranking Republican member on Aeronautical and Space Sciences Committee (Eighty-eighth through Ninety-first Congresses). She was the first woman to be placed in nomination for the presidency at a major party convention in 1964; was a visiting professor for the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation 1973-1976; was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom on July 6, 1989; was a resident of Skowhegan, Maine, until her death on May 29, 1995; her remains were cremated, and ashes placed in the residential wing of the Margaret Chase Smith Library, Skowhegan, Maine.

 
Margaret Madeleine Chase
 
35 Margaret Chase Smith was born in Skowhegan, Maine, on December 14, 1897. Her entry into politics came through the career of Clyde Smith, the man she married in 1930. Clyde was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1936; Margaret served as his secretary. When Clyde died in 1940, Margaret succeeded her husband. After four terms in the House, she won election to the United States Senate in 1948. In so doing, she became the first woman elected to both houses of Congress.
Senator Smith came to national attention on June 1, 1950, when she became the first member of the Senate to denounce the tactics used by colleague Joseph McCarthy in his anticommunist crusade. Following her "Declaration of Conscience" speech, some pundits speculated that she might be the vice-presidential candidate on the 1952 Republican ticket. The opportunity, however, never materialized. In 1964, Senator Smith pursued her own political ambitions, running in several Republican presidential primaries. She took her candidacy all the way to the Republican National Convention in San Francisco, where she became the first woman to have her name placed in nomination for the presidency by either of the two major parties. In the final balloting, Smith refused to withdraw and so wound up coming in second to the Republican nominee, Senator Barry Goldwater.

After four terms in the Senate and thirty-two years in Congress, Senator Smith lost re-election in 1972. She retired to her home in Skowhegan and began planning for the establishment of a library. The Margaret Chase Smith Library opened in 1982 and for the next dozen years, she presided over the facility, meeting with admirers, former constituents, politicians, policymakers, researchers, and school children. Margaret Chase Smith died at her home on Memorial Day, May 29, 1995.
 
Margaret Madeleine Chase
 
36 Veteran of World War II, serving in the Army Air Corps. Paul H. Chase
 
37 Mayflower passenger James Chilton
 
38 Enlisted in Company K 30th Maine Volunteers
died while in service at Memphis, MO 1863 
Ansel P. Clark
 
39 His father died before his birth and his mother got remarried to Roger Clinton. Bill's last name was legally changed to Clinton on 12 June 1962.  William Jefferson Clinton (Blythe IV)
 
40 Died during child birth. Lydia Day
 
41 Prior to 1663 the majority of women who arrived in Canada were married to one of the settlers or were single women who came looking for a husband. These single women were few in number and often paid their own passage to Canada by a contract of indenture. In 1663 when King Louis XIV became concerned with populating the colony of New France. He directed a recruitment of women to be sent to Canada.

Once chosen, the girl was given passage, clothing, and personal necessities. She was also given a dowry of 59 livres if she married a soldier or habitant. She was given 100 livres if she married an officer. Of the nearly 1000 women who undertook the journey, about 800 made it to Canada. These women arrived between 1663 and 1673. There distinction of being a King's Daughter is noted by the marriage contract which showed the dowry from the king.

Catherine de Baillon, wife of Jacques Miville dit Deschenes, was such an individual. She came with a 1000 livres dowry and was considered to be born from an upper class family. Her ancestory can now be traced back to Charlemagne and the 7th century.

 
Catherine De Baillon
 
42 His name appears as having enlisted from Boothbay, on a roll of men raised in Lincoln County to march to Providence to reinforce Col. Wade's and Col. Jacob's regiments , dated Pownalborough August 20, 1778.
He enlisted again May 18, 1781, for three years from Canaan. Served as a private and drummer in Capt. Miller's and Capt. Fox's companies, Col. Henry Jackson's regiment of the Massachusetts line, and received Dec. 1783, an Honorable Discharge.
He was a U.S. pensioner, and received in 1836 a grant of $50 from the State of Maine.
He is said to have had 5 sons and 9 grandsons in Civil War service. 
Ebenezer Dean
 
43 Enlisted as a Private on 13 October 1862 at the age of 26.
Enlisted in Company H, 24th Infantry Regiment Maine on 13 Oct 1862.
Promoted to Full Corporal on 31 May 1863.
Mustered Out Company H, 24th Infantry Regiment Maine on 25 Aug 1863 at Augusta, ME.
 
Jesse Dean
 
44 Jesse R. Dean of Madison, ME enlisted on 13 Oct 1862, at the age of 44, as a private in Company H, 24th Infantry Regiment of Maine. Received a disability discharge from Company H, 24th Infantry Regiment Maine.
 
Jesse Robert Dean
 
45 Will of William Deanne, dated July 22, 1634 proved October 21, 1634 of S. Chard, Somerset, England (NEHGR 1897, Vol 51 p.432)I William Dean of Southchard within parish of Chard in the county of Somersett sicke of bodie but of sound and perfect memorie thanks bee given to God doe make and decalare this my last Will and Testament.......I give to the poore of Chardland twenty shillings to bee distributed by the discrecon of my Executor and of MY SONNE THOMAS DEANE ONE OF MY OVERSEERS... Item to JOHN DEANE MY SONNE I give and bequeath a chest standing in the hall, a truckle bedsted and bed furnished, wheat the halfendeale of the hay wich is in COLFIELD the remynder of the terme yet to come in BROADFIELD together with the lease thereof. The residue of the terme yet to come in HAM MEADE and the Lease thereof, yeelding and paying therefore from the Feast date of St. Michaell next after my decease to SUSAN, ELLIANOR, MARGERIE AND ELIZABETH MY DAUGHTERS foure pounds apeece yearelie during the contynuance of his now estate therein and soe rateably for any lesser terme of his estate therein at any other tyme then at the end of a full yeare happen to take end and determyne, Also I give and bequeath to him in money fortie shillings to bee paid him within three moneths after my decease. Item to MY SONNE THOMAS (for that hee is otherwise in comptetent manner provided for) I onely give and and bequeath to him and to his wife as a remembrance of my fatherly love two silver spoons. Item to WALTER DEAN MY SONNE I give a chest standing in the chamber over the Kitchen, a truckle bedsted and bed furnished, and a bible also I give unto him iontlie [jointly] with his BROTHER ISSACK the Lease or Leases of the grounds name WILBEERE and CANTES, and together with his said brother all profitts on the said grounds to bee received and taken during the contynuance of the terme therein yet remayneing. Item to ISSACK DEANE MY SONNE I bequeath and give a Chest and little Fojelett or box standing in the lower chamber, a truckle bed furnished and the halfendeale of the hay in COLEFIELD, and alsoe together with HIS BROTHER WALTER DEANE I give and bequeath the grounds above menconed name WILBEER AND CANTES, by the ioyntly to be occupied during the terme therein remayneing together with the lease or leases thereof, also I give him that little woodvine withouth the utter(outer) kitchen doore, and all tymber felled and all such rafters and boords reede and billies which I have, and also in money tenne pounds to bee paid within and also in money tenne pounds to bee paid within two moneths after my decease. Item to MY DAUGHTER SUSAN DEANE I give that bedstead which is in the inner chamber with its appurtennces, one skellet, a posnett, a great barrell, a side saddle, a coffer in the inner chamber, a third part of all my wooll, the CHAPPELL and YE WRITEINGS for holding thereof and in money seaventy three pounds six shillings an eight pence to bee paid at the end of six months. Item to MY DAUGHTER ELEANOR DEANE I give and bequeath that Cofer which is in the chamber of the kitching, a bed stead also standing there and my best feathered furnished, a little brasse pott, one of my greater barrells, a piltion and a third part of all my wooll, and seaventie three pounds six shillings and eight pence in money to bee paid at the end of six moneths after my decease. Item to MARGERIE STRONG MY DAUGHTER I give the least brasse pott of the three, my best cauldron and tenne pounds in money to bee paid within one yeare after my decease, and to HER SONNE and MY GRAND CHILD JOHN STRONG. I give five pounds to be paid att the end of two yeares after my decease upon sufficient discharge given to acquite my executor thereof. Item To MY YOUNGEST DAUGHTER ELIZABETH I give and bequeath a bedstead in the Low chamber, a featherbed furnished, a little table boord over the entire, a coffer in the inner chamber, one of the great barrells, the third part of my wooll and seaventie three pounds six shillings and eight pence in money to bee paid at the end of six moneths after my decease. And if any to whom an procon (portion) is hereby given chance to dye before his her or their porcon or pocons bee due to bee paid my will therein is that such their porcon or porcons be devyded equallie betweene MY THREE YOUNGER SONNES JOHN, WALTER AND ISAAKE and my FOWER DAUGHTERS, or betweene such of them as then bee livieing. Lastly I hereby ordeine and appoynt WILLIAM DEANE MY ELDEST SONNE to bee Executor of this my las will and testament, and THOMAS LEGG SONNE OF THOMAS LEGG THE ELDER and MY SONNE THOMAS DEANE Overseers hereof, and in consideracon thereof doe give to each of them two shillings. By mee William Deane. And as touching the clause in the latter end of the will that if any Legatee dye before his or her porcon become due, the testator shewed that his meaneing therein is that if any of his daughters chaunce to marry and doe happen being married to dye that such her porcon shall then bee paid to the husband of such daughter. These being Witnesses, WILLIAM COGAN, THOMAS LEGGE, THOMAS DEANE, JOHN GIBBS No. I. William Deane
 
46 Major in the Revolutionary War.
First settler of Durham, Maine 
Charles Gerrish
 
47 Died in the Revolutionary War - 20 years old James Gerrish
 
48 David's parents have not yet been proven.
The 1940 census shows 4 year old David living with his Grand Parents Luther and Mabel and their 23 year old daughter Muriel.
Luther and Mabel had a son named Arnold and 2 daughters Muriel and Caroline.
David had the last name of Hartford, which would leave us to believe that Arnold was his father, no proof has been found yet.
Muriel's Obituary mentions David as a very special nephew, as she and David were the only persons living with Luther and Mabel in 1940, this opens speculation that David was Muriel's child born out of wedlock.
Further research is needed to solve this mystery. 
David Hartford
 
49 John was the first Heald to come to America. He came with his wife and family to Concord, Massachusetts in about 1641. The first 4 or 5 generations of descendants of his settled in and around Concord. They then went to Hillsborough County, New Hampshire and settled for many years, then some went on to Kennebec County, Maine. John Heald
 
50 Lieut. John Heald, on 19th Apr. 1689, commanded the Concord troops that marched on Boston, and participated in the overthrow of the arbitrary Sir Edmund Andros.

John and Mary's graves are near the top of the hill in the Old Hill Cmty in Concord.

After the death of John Heald II, John III inherited a part interest which his father had acquired in the Adams mill , and for a time the mill was jointly operated by James Adams and John Heald III,. In 1700 John III bought all the Adams property including the Adams interest in the mill. The Adams mill had a vertical saw, known as an up and down saw. John Heald III house stood across from James Adams. 
John Heald
 

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